Are Your Medical Leads Taking a Beating?

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Broken. That’s the word that best describes a lot of Brazilians after being utterly blindsided by Germany in the World Cup semi-finals. But while you may not be a sports fan, a quick search can make for easy guesses as to why the spectacular loss. (One of which was the absence of its star player Neymar.)

A defeat like this can serve as a cautionary tale to those who run seemingly ‘successful’ marketing campaigns but not realize the beating that’s taking place. For all the medical leads you’ve racked up, it may not matter if the proverbial truck carrying them winds up tipping over.

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Medical Lead Generation Tips – Relying on Business Weathermen

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Weather forecasts are typically consulted prior to big outdoor events like the Thanksgiving Parade and, of course, this year’s 4th of July. Fireworks. Barbecues. It’s hard to have any of these when your local weatherman is predicting some rainfall.

In the same sense, marketers in the healthcare industry often turn their attention to industry news when planning lead generation campaigns. For them, anything that impacts the industry itself would logically impact their target markets. Examples can include the recent impact of Obamacare on the demand for nurses.

Still, if the weatherman isn’t always right, can the same be said of industry news?

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Getting Health Leads from Those Staying Healthy

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Handling a sports team can be like handling a business in of itself. The star players aren’t just the employees. The audience is not just the paying customer. It makes sense that plenty of health and fitness related businesses throw their services at their feet as a means to keep everyone in top shape. Look at what Johnson & Johnson is doing as an official sponsor.

These teams however aren’t the only kinds of business prospects that fit this description. If you’re looking for health leads beyond individual care, there are plenty of organizations that demand just as much fitness from their own work force.

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Go for the Alpha When Sharing Expertise?

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In the new animated film How to Train Your Dragon 2, you got to see more of the ecological aspects of world’s dragons. What’s particularly noteworthy was the use of alpha domination. Like many real animals, dragons can be dominated (even against their will) by an alpha who in turn can only be challenged by another of equal strength.

So when sharing expertise to a prospect organization, it seems to make just as much sense to go for its own alpha. Wouldn’t medical leads come faster if you could simply influence the one whose authority overrides that of all others?

You’re forgetting what it takes to even get their attention.

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Using Medical Leads to Encourage Responsibility

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For those working in healthcare, they don’t want just convenience. They want convenience to translate into productivity. That’s why when you’re trying to generate medical leads, don’t just try and appeal to their need for easier work. You should hold them responsible to make the easier job more meaningful.

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When Sharing Expertise, Check How Far Prospects Actually Follow!

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It seems that online reviews are affecting even the medical profession. All the more reason to build up your online reputation right? But of course, reviews can be flawed in of themselves. They could come from particularly disgruntled patients. And in your case, is it really all right to know that an unruly practice is out there badmouthing your firm?

Still, that’s the price you pay when you give away advice but don’t make sure if prospects actually follow. It’s like the old flesh wound joke where the tough guy refuses treatment for injury.

Then, again maybe they’re not all tough guys. Maybe they’re the types who actually have trouble following your advice when you’re sharing your expertise.

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When Medical Lead Generation Becomes a Pit Fight

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There’s a lot of hate for RFPs among the sales community, including the ones who cater to the healthcare industry. Why is that?

Is it because of the competition? The pickiness of prospects? Does the value of medical lead generation drop because all it does is throw you into these RFP pit fights?

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Medical Lead Generation Tips – Don’t Abuse the Warning Signs

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Medical lead generation is like a doctor’s check up in many ways. You diagnoses the healthiness of a practice’s management, test their compliance, and there are any problems, you urge for treatment.

But when you use symptoms too frequently, knowledge of the bad news might end up paralyzing your prospect’s decision. It’s like working under the possibility that the stress could suddenly cause heart problems.  You’d have to be a particularly brave person to keep working, let alone find an organization full of such people.

Being the Sole Source = Sole Source of Health Leads?

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Healthcare is no stranger to the pains of supply and demand. The cost of rare cures/treatments for rare diseases is more or less a cliché. And yeah, being its sole provider can logically generate enough attention to ensure a steady flow of health leads.

The real question though should that make it the only source?

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Medical Lead Generation Tips – Handling High-Risk Takers

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In the healthcare industries, organizations that provide products/services in a bulk to other organizations seem just like another case of one being a doctor to another.

However, there are cases when the doctor becomes increasingly worried about a patient who does nothing but take high risks. They live dangerous lives where every day for them is either death or glory.

On the organizational level, there are scenarios that hardly differ. Everything from labor that risk mortal injury to paying high costs that would take a while to recover from. Finding prospects who turn out to be high-risk takers can foreshadow a tumultuous business relationship.

Why you should qualify them anyway.

Risk-takers aren’t just defined by the size of their risks, the life threatening effort they put in, or the bare scrapes they’ve had.

The best ones are the ones who still manage to stay floating.

Ever wondered what their secrets were? If you think they’d be the stuff of self-help books and success stories, you might be right. That doesn’t exactly make them easier to work with.

There is a pattern to their behavior though and that is what you need to align yourself with so that you can both guide them and brace yourself when they come to you.

  • They have but one goal – It’s easier to succeed when you focus all your resources on it. That is the case when risk-takers bank everything on one thing. Understanding that may not make it easier to help them reduce the risks. It can help you understand why they do what they do.
  • They space their attempts – They’re like sprinters. Once they reach their desired mile, the stop and cool off. Take deep breaths before the next run. If you want a fancier analogy, it’s like firing a superweapon but they need time to reload, recharge, and repair once it is.
  • They’re vulnerable while recovering – It doesn’t take a medic to know this. This might also be where you come in. In any case, the exhaustion of resources doesn’t put them in a good mood for the medical bill. Do your job first. Let them rest until their business/organization is recovered enough to think about payments and such.

On the bright side, you get to see that they get the job done faster and quicker because they ‘sprint’ towards their goals. Others would normally just walk slowly and can afford the occasional delay.

You just need to pay more attention to what happens after the sprint instead of how much strain a rush like that could have on a business. The best help you can give them is not avoiding risks but to help them recover better, faster, in order to make another dash.

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